What Became of ProjectMath2003

By | November 29, 2017
In 2003, I invested a ton of resources into getting my class online. This allowed parents and children alike to get copies of notes, lesson plans, assignments and even chat live with me through an implementation of Moodle. The goal was to have 100% of what I did in class on-line. I called it ProjectMath2003. I was even able to send math formulae through my site by the use of .
 
Parents lauded praise. The district lauded reprimands.
 
I ceased, and went back to paper only. Parents that had a second child that I taught a year or so later were visibly distressed that I no longer ran my on-line classroom.  Parents and students alike attested to the value of free-access that I granted them.
 
Most of those efforts are now policies.  You see, the problem was not what I was doing, but that the local, district and state didn't have policies affording the integration of new technologies into the classroom.  Sure, they talked a good story.  Computers got placed in the classrooms.  But, tools without guidance are just distractions.  And when you use them in a creative way that scares the adults that are ultimately responsible for their implementation, things get stifled.
 
Amazing how pioneers get their spirits and efforts crushed.
Technology grows at an ever-increasing pace. It is our jobs as leaders in our community to insure it's proper use.  I harbor no ill will of those that stopped me, or at minimum dissuaded me.  It was a sign of the times.  I do, however, hope that the leaders of today take a more proactive policy approach that will encourage, foster and incubate the further exploration and integration of technologies in and out of the physical classroom environment.
Before I became disabled, I had desire to run for public office so I could effect change in the policies concerning this.  I don't currently have the physical resources to do so.  I wish I did.
is a system of being able to publish something like easily in manuscripts, blogs and many forms of electronic communications.  I fell in love with it and wanted to publish an Algebra Primer using it.  Quite possibly, I may as of yet.
Thanks for reading,
Jay C. Theriot